September 21, 2015
By Dr. Michael Mizhiritsky

Lower back pain is one of the more common complaints to a doctor. Almost everyone will experience lower back pain at least once in their lifetime. Inactivity, lack of proper exercise, being overweight, smoking, family history, jobs or tasks that require heavy lifting, or frequent repetitive activities are just some of the risk factors that can lead to lower back pain.

September 18, 2015
By Elizabeth Right Reiss

Your aspiring athlete is on a roll. They have been taking the initiative and working on their own, focusing on wall exercises, practicing with coaches and friends, and even getting enough sleep. 

August 7, 2015
By Dr. Leon Popovitz

Repetitive overhead sports, such as tennis or throwing sports, can lead to various conditions in the shoulder. One common condition is a SLAP tear (Superior Labrum Anterior Posterior).

August 4, 2015
By New York Tennis Magazine Staff

Some of the best in the area at keeping you in shape and on the court, including: Dr. Tom Ferraro, Metropolitan Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine, NY Bone and Joint Specialists, Orin & Cohen, Peak Performance, and Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine. 

July 13, 2015
By Irina Belfer-Lehat

High school tennis players work hard both on and off the court, and often forget about proper hydration and nutrition during tennis season.

September 18, 2014
By Irina Belfer-Lehat

Following proper nutrition preparation will guarantee an improved tennis match. Packing your lunch box with proper snacks and fluids will help you to avoid fatigue and cramps and will prepare you for any early, late or multiple matches. Here are some easy tips on what super snacks and drinks to have in your lunch box when playing in a tournament.

July 10, 2014
By Irina Belfer-Lehat

Tennis is a unique sport that involves intense physical activity for a prolonged period of time. Nobody knows how long one's match will last until the final point is won. 

June 5, 2014
By Irina Belfer-Lehat

We all know that tennis is a unique sport that requires intense physical activity for a prolonged period of time. Especially with the high school boys tennis season currently in play, it is important to focus on proper nutrition both off and on the court to maximize performance (and of course, wins)! 

November 26, 2013
By Dr. Eric Price

A meniscus is a cartilage structure that provides shock absorption and cushioning in the knee joint. There are two menisci. 

February 11, 2013
By New York Tennis Magazine Staff

New York Tennis Magazine’s 2013 Gym Guide takes a closer look at IMG Academy, Manhattan Plaza Health Club, Sportime Randall's Island, Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy and The Club of Riverdale.

December 4, 2012
By Peter Pine
For the vast majority of tennis players, the main reason we play tennis is because we find it fun. Putting the fun part aside, I am sure many of you have wondered about the benefits associated with playing tennis. Studies have been conducted and show that there are many benefits which make it one of the best sports to play for all ages. Below are a few of the major benefits outlined.
April 26, 2012
By Michael L. Murphy
The saying goes: “You are what you eat.” But you are also “How you eat” and “When you eat.” A tennis training diet should be focused on high-energy foods and proper hydration. The adequate portions of your diet should be timed appropriately before and after competition.
February 7, 2012
By Barbara Ordes
Cardio Tennis is fun, fast and affordable! I love seeing the same people, week after week, improve their quickness, reaction time and tennis skills with just an hour workout that is way more exciting than another trip to the gym.
September 29, 2011
By Sophie Scott
A physically active lifestyle is important for all age groups. Reasons to participate in sports, such as tennis are many, such as pleasure and relaxation, competition, socialization, maintenance and improvement of fitness and health
July 28, 2011
By Dr. Juan Gargiulo
Platelet Rich Plasma, or “PRP,” is one of a growing number of therapies which enhances the body’s ability to heal itself. During a PRP procedure, a certified physician extracts one to two ounces of blood from the vein, and uses a centrifuge to separate out the platelets.